News

Organisation Release: Our Place in Space to launch in…

heic1701 — Organisation Release

Astronomy and art combine in a brand new Hubble-inspired exhibition

20 January 2017

For 26 years, the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has been expanding our cosmic horizons. In capturing an astronomical number of images, Hubble has revealed and shared the beauty, wonder, and complexity of the Universe. Now on 1 February 2017, a new exhibition called Our Place in Space will open in Venice, Italy. It will present a breathtaking visual journey, through our Solar System and out to the edge of the known Universe, alongside Hubble-inspired works by contemporary Italian artists.

The new travelling exhibition Our Place in Space will be on display from 1 February to 17 April 2017 in the Istituto Veneto di Scienze, Lettere ed Arti, Palazzo Cavalli Franchetti, on the banks of the Grand Canal in Venice, Italy. By seamlessly integrating perspectives from both artists and astronomers, it will inspire visitors to think about how humanity fits into the grand scheme of the Universe.

Since the dawn of civilisation, we have gazed up into the night sky and attempted to make sense of what we saw there, asking fundamental questions such as: Where do we come from? What is our place in the Universe? And are we alone? As we ask those questions today and new technology expands our horizons further into space, our yearning for their answers only grows. Since its launch in 1990, Hubble has continued this quest for answers. It symbolises the human urge to explore, because it contains technologically-advanced instruments designed to discover and observe unexplored objects in the Universe, and also because it was designed to be serviced in orbit by astronauts. Hubble has not only made countless astronomical discoveries but also brought astronomy into the public eye, satisfying our curiosity, firing our imagination, and greatly impacting our culture, society, and art.

Our Place in Space features iconic Hubble images, extending from our own cosmic backyard — the faces of Mars, Jupiter’s Great Red Spot, Saturn’s intense aurorae — out to a stunning selection of far-flung galaxies, nebulae, and other astronomical phenomena. But alongside the scientific interpretation of the Universe, the exhibition also taps into the vast imaginations of prominent Italian artists, who have produced pieces inspired by what Hubble has seen. The artworks range from oil and mixed media on canvas to alabaster-sculpted nebulae, and from planetary spheres encrusted with mosaics of Murano glass to a spacecraft built from recycled wood, plastic, and toys. A combination of images and videos, artworks and installations enable visitors to experience the different visions of astronomers and artists. This fusion of science and art provides a more unique and complete view of our Universe and our understanding of it.

The Instituto Veneto has previously hosted the exhibition The Hubble Space Telescope: Twenty Years at the Frontiers of Science, or Il telescopio spaziale Hubble, alle frontiere dell’Universo, in 2010. This exhibition was a stellar success, visited by 12 000 people over the course of a single month, and it marked the beginning of a partnership between the Istituto Veneto di Scienze, Lettere ed Arti, the European Space Agency, and the Space Telescope Science Institute.

After being on display in Venice the exhibition will be shown in the medieval town of Chiavenna, Italy, from 5 May to 31 August 2017. There it will be hosted at the Palazzo Vertemate and other nearby palaces. Afterwards it will be put on display in Garching, Germany, in the ESO Supernova Planetarium & Visitor Centre. Further stops in other European countries, the USA and even Australia are planned. Entrance to the exhibition is free of charge on all occasions.

More information

The Hubble Space Telescope is a project of international cooperation between ESA and NASA.

Our Place in Space is coordinated by ESA/Hubble, in partnership with the Space Telescope Science Institute.

The exhibition is curated by Antonella Nota and Anna Caterina Bellati.

Participating artists are Antonio Abbatepaolo, Marco Bolognesi, Paola Giordano, Ettore Greco, Mario Paschetta, Alessandro Spadari, Marialuisa Tadei, Sara Teresano, Mario Vespasiani, Dania Zanotto.

The exhibition executive committee consists of Ken Carpenter (NASA HST), Lars Lindberg Christensen (ESO), Carol Christian (STScI), Roger Davies (University of Oxford, UK), Mathias Jäger (ESA/Hubble) and Hussein Jirdeh (STScI).

Links

Contacts

Antonella Nota

ESA HST Project Scientist, STScI

Email: nota@stsci.edu

Anna Caterina Bellati

Exhibition Curator

Email: info@bellatieditore.com

Mathias Jäger

ESA/Hubble, Public Information Officer

Garching bei München, Germany

Tel: +49 176 62397500

Email: hubble@eso.org

News

Science Release: Cosmic lenses support finding on faster than…

Kids

heic1702 — Science Release

26 January 2017

By using galaxies as giant gravitational lenses, an international group of astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have made an independent measurement of how fast the Universe is expanding. The newly measured expansion rate for the local Universe is consistent with earlier findings. These are, however, in intriguing disagreement with measurements of the early Universe. This hints at a fundamental problem at the very heart of our understanding of the cosmos.

The Hubble constant — the rate at which the Universe is expanding — is one of the fundamental quantities describing our Universe. A group of astronomers from the H0LiCOW collaboration, led by Sherry Suyu (associated with the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics in Germany, the ASIAA in Taiwan and the Technical University of Munich), used the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and other telescopes [1] in space and on the ground to observe five galaxies in order to arrive at an independent measurement of the Hubble constant [2].

The new measurement is completely independent of — but in excellent agreement with — other measurements of the Hubble constant in the local Universe that used Cepheid variable stars and supernovae as points of reference [heic1611].

However, the value measured by Suyu and her team, as well as those measured using Cepheids and supernovae, are different from the measurement made by the ESA Planck satellite. But there is an important distinction — Planck measured the Hubble constant for the early Universe by observing the cosmic microwave background.

While the value for the Hubble constant determined by Planck fits with our current understanding of the cosmos, the values obtained by the different groups of astronomers for the local Universe are in disagreement with our accepted theoretical model of the Universe. “The expansion rate of the Universe is now starting to be measured in different ways with such high precision that actual discrepancies may possibly point towards new physics beyond our current knowledge of the Universe,” elaborates Suyu.

The targets of the study were massive galaxies positioned between Earth and very distant quasars — incredibly luminous galaxy cores. The light from the more distant quasars is bent around the huge masses of the galaxies as a result of strong gravitational lensing[3]. This creates multiple images of the background quasar, some smeared into extended arcs.

Because galaxies do not create perfectly spherical distortions in the fabric of space and the lensing galaxies and quasars are not perfectly aligned, the light from the different images of the background quasar follows paths which have slightly different lengths. Since the brightness of quasars changes over time, astronomers can see the different images flicker at different times, the delays between them depending on the lengths of the paths the light has taken. These delays are directly related to the value of the Hubble constant. “Our method is the most simple and direct way to measure the Hubble constant as it only uses geometry and General Relativity, no other assumptions,” explains co-lead Frédéric Courbin from EPFL, Switzerland

Using the accurate measurements of the time delays between the multiple images, as well as computer models, has allowed the team to determine the Hubble constant to an impressively high precision: 3.8% [4]. “An accurate measurement of the Hubble constant is one of the most sought-after prizes in cosmological research today,” highlights team member Vivien Bonvin, from EPFL, Switzerland. And Suyu adds: “The Hubble constant is crucial for modern astronomy as it can help to confirm or refute whether our picture of the Universe — composed of dark energy, dark matter and normal matter — is actually correct, or if we are missing something fundamental.

Notes

[1] The study used, alongside the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, the Keck Telescope, ESO’s Very Large Telescope, the Subaru Telescope, the Gemini Telescope, the Victor M. Blanco Telescope, the Canada-France-Hawaii telescope and the NASA Spitzer Space Telescope. In addition, data from the Swiss 1.2-metre Leonhard Euler Telescope and the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope were used.

[2] The gravitational lensing time-delay method that the astronomers used here to achieve a value for the Hubble constant is especially important owing to its near-independence of the three components our Universe consists of: normal matter, dark matter and dark energy. Though not completely separate, the method is only weakly dependent on these.

[3] Gravitational lensing was first predicted by Albert Einstein more than a century ago. All matter in the Universe warps the space around itself, with larger masses producing a more pronounced effect. Around very massive objects, such as galaxies, light that passes close by follows this warped space, appearing to bend away from its original path by a clearly visible amount. This is known as strong gravitational lensing.

[4] The H0LiCOW team determined a value for the Hubble constant of 71.9±2.7 kilometres per second per Megaparsec. In 2016 scientists using Hubble measured a value of 73.24±1.74 kilometres per second per Megaparsec. In 2015, the ESA Planck Satellite measured the constant with the highest precision so far and obtained a value of 66.93±0.62 kilometres per second per Megaparsec.

More information

The Hubble Space Telescope is a project of international cooperation between ESA and NASA.

This research was presented in a series of papers to appear in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

The papers are entitled as follows: “H0LiCOW I. H0 Lenses in COSMOGRAIL’s Wellspring: Program Overview”, by Suyu et al., “H0LiCOW II. Spectroscopic survey and galaxy-group identification of the strong gravitational lens system HE 0435−1223”, by Sluse et al., “H0LiCOW III. Quantifying the effect of mass along the line of sight to the gravitational lens HE 0435−1223 through weighted galaxy counts”, by Rusu et al., “H0LiCOW IV. Lens mass model of HE 0435−1223 and blind measurement of its time-delay distance for cosmology”, by Wong et al., and “H0LiCOW V. New COSMOGRAIL time delays of HE 0435−1223: H0 to 3.8% precision from strong lensing in a flat ΛCDM model”, by Bonvin et al.

The international team consists of: S. H. Suyu (Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Germany; Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Taiwan; Technical University of Munich, Germany), V. Bonvin (Laboratory of Astrophysics, EPFL, Switzerland), F. Courbin (Laboratory of Astrophysics, EPFL, Switzerland), C. D. Fassnacht (University of California, Davis, USA), C. E. Rusu (University of California, Davis, USA), D. Sluse (STAR Institute, Belgium), T. Treu (University of California, Los Angeles, USA), K. C. Wong (National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Japan; Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Taiwan), M. W. Auger (University of Cambridge, UK), X. Ding (University of California, Los Angeles, USA; Beijing Normal University, China), S. Hilbert (Exzellenzcluster Universe, Germany; Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Munich, Germany), P. J. Marshall (Stanford University, USA), N. Rumbaugh (University of California, Davis, USA), A. Sonnenfeld (Kavli IPMU, the University of Tokyo, Japan; University of California, Los Angeles, USA; University of California, Santa Barbara, USA), M. Tewes (Argelander-Institut für Astronomie, Germany), O. Tihhonova (Laboratory of Astrophysics, EPFL, Switzerland), A. Agnello (ESO, Garching, Germany), R. D. Blandford (Stanford University, USA), G. C.-F. Chen (University of California, Davis, USA; Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Taiwan), T. Collett (University of Portsmouth, UK), L. V. E. Koopmans (University of Groningen, The Netherlands), K. Liao (University of California, Los Angeles, USA), G. Meylan (Laboratory of Astrophysics, EPFL, Switzerland), C. Spiniello (INAF – Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Italy; Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Garching, Germany) and A. Yıldırım (Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Garching, Germany)

Image credit: NASA, ESA, Suyu (Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics), Auger (University of Cambridge)

Links

Contacts

Sherry Suyu

Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics

Garching, Germany

Tel: +49 89 30000 2015

Email: suyu@mpa-garching.mpg.de

Vivien Bonvin

Institute of Physics, Laboratory of Astrophysics, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Observatory of Sauverny

Versoix, Switzerland

Tel: +41 22 3792420

Email: vivien.bonvin@epfl.ch

Frederic Courbin

Institute of Physics, Laboratory of Astrophysics, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Observatory of Sauverny

Versoix, Switzerland

Tel: +41 22 3792418

Email: frederic.courbin@epfl.ch

Mathias Jäger

ESA/Hubble, Public Information Officer

Garching, Germany

Tel: +49 176 62397500

Email: hubble@eso.org

News

Science Release: Hubble finds big brother of Halley’s Comet…

heic1703 — Science Release

9 February 2017

Scientists using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have observed, for the first time, a massive, comet-like object that has been ripped apart and scattered in the atmosphere of a white dwarf. The destroyed object had a chemical composition similar to Halley’s Comet, but was 100 000 times more massive than its famous counterpart.

The international team of astronomers observed the white dwarf WD 1425+540, about 170 light-years from Earth in the constellation Boötes (the Herdsman) [1]. While studying the white dwarf’s atmosphere using both the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and the W. M. Keck Observatory the team found evidence that an object rather like a massive comet was falling onto the star, getting tidally disrupted while doing so.

The team determined that the object had a chemical composition similar to the famous Halley’s Comet in our own Solar System, but it was 100 000 times more massive and had twice the proportion of water as its local counterpart. Spectral analysis showed that the destroyed object was rich in the elements essential for life, including carbon, oxygen, sulphur and even nitrogen [2].

This makes it the first detection of nitrogen in the debris falling onto a white dwarf. Lead author Siyi Xu of the European Southern Observatory, Germany, explains the importance of the discovery: “Nitrogen is a very important element for life as we know it. This particular object is quite rich in nitrogen, more so than any object observed in our Solar System.”

There are already more than a dozen white dwarfs known to be polluted with infalling debris from rocky, asteroid-like objects, but this is the first time a body made of icy, comet-like material has been seen polluting a white dwarf’s atmosphere. These findings are evidence for a belt of comet-like bodies, similar to our Solar System’s Kuiper Belt, orbiting the white dwarf. These icy bodies apparently survived the star’s evolution from a main sequence star — similar to our Sun — to a red giant and its final collapse to a small, dense white dwarf.

The team that made this discovery also considered how this massive object got from its original, distant orbit onto a collision course with its parent star [3]. The change in the orbit could have been caused by the gravitational distribution by so far undetected, surviving planets which have perturbed the belt of comets. Another explanation could be that the companion star of the white dwarf disturbed the belt and caused objects from the belt to travel toward the white dwarf. The change in orbit could also have been caused by a combination of these two scenarios.

The Kuiper Belt in the Solar System, which extends outward from Neptune’s orbit, is home to many dwarf planets, comets, and other small bodies left over from the formation of the Solar System. The new findings now provide observational evidence to support the idea that icy bodies are also present in other planetary systems and have survived throughout the history of the star’s evolution.

Notes

[1] The white dwarf was first found in 1974 and is part of a wide binary system, with a companion star separated by 2000 times the distance that the Earth is from the Sun.

[2] The measurements of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, silicon, sulphur, iron and nickel and hydrogen come from the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS), installed at the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. The W. M. Keck Telescopes provided the calcium, magnesium, and hydrogen.

[3] The team calculated that the accreted object originally resided about 300 astronomical units — 300 times the distance Earth-Sun — away from the white dwarf. This is seven times further out than the Kuiper-Belt objects in the Solar System.

More information

The Hubble Space Telescope is a project of international cooperation between ESA and NASA.

The international team of astronomers in this study consists of S. Xu (ESO, Germany), B. Zuckerman (Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, USA), P. Dufour (Institut de Recherche sur les Exoplanètes, Université de Montréal, Canada), E. D. Young (Department of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles), B. Klein (Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, USA), M. Jura (Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, USA)

Image credit: NASA, ESA, and Z. Levy (STScI)

Links

Contacts

Siyi Xu

European Southern Observatory

Garching bei München, Germany

Tel: +49 89 3200 6298

Email: sxu@eso.org

Mathias Jäger

ESA/Hubble, Public Information Officer

Garching, Germany

Tel: +49 176 62397500

Email: mjaeger@partner.eso.org

News

Les miroirs les plus parfaits du monde

Images chez un antiquaire

Miroir, miroir. Ô, mon beau miroir. Dis-moi : qui est le plus beau, le plus parfait, le plus réfléchissant des miroirs ?

Si cet objet savait parler, il répondrait, sans hésiter que les meilleurs miroirs se trouvent au Laboratoire des Matériaux Avancées, dans la banlieue de Lyon.

ITV Christophe Michel

Donc traditionnellement, on dit que nos miroirs sont plus plus parfaits qui existent au monde, d’une part parce que le verre qu’on utilise est le verre le plus pur qui existe, donc qui comporte le minimum de défauts à l’intérieur…

Et d’autre part, ces miroirs réfléchissent la quasi-totalité de la lumière incidente grâce à un dépôt de matière à la surface que seul ce laboratoire est capable de faire…

ITV Christophe Michel

Nous allons déposer 0,007 mm d’épaisseur, sur la surface, et avec ces 0,007 mm, communément appelé des microns, on va passer de 4% de réflexion, à 99,999%. Ce processus de dépôt dure environ jusqu’à 40 heures.

Cette propriété ultra-réfléchissante n’est certes, pas flagrante sur ces images. Car ici nous parlons de rayons infra-rouges, une lumière qui n’est pas visible pour nous les humains. Mais cette lumière infra-rouge, et les miroirs ultra-réfléchissant fabriqués ici, sont les composants clés des grands détecteurs d’ondes gravitationnelles comme LIGO, aux Etats-Unis et Virgo, en Italie.

Ces machines démesurées, avec des bras de 3 à 4 kilomètres de long, mesurent les tremblements de l’Univers – ces fameuses ondes dans l’espace-temps produites par la collision de deux trous noirs ou autres cataclysmes cosmiques…

Mais le signal qui arrive sur Terre est incroyablement faible.

Pour mesurer ces perturbations de l’espace-temps, les détecteurs Ligo et Virgo utilisent la technique de l’interférométrie.

Un laser, émis par une source, est divisé en deux par un miroir spécial. Le faisceau va voyager le long des deux bras avant d’être réfléchis et recombinés. Les ondes lumineuses, dites en opposition de phase s’annulent.

Au passage d’une onde gravitationnelle, les longueurs des bras varient, ce qui change l’interférence du laser. Le signal est alors détectable.

Le laser doit être extrêmement stable – et les miroirs aussi parfaits que possible.

Les scientifiques doivent donc s’appuyer sur les technologies les plus avancées du monde.

La masse du miroir – le substrat de verre d’une pureté exceptionnelle – voit le jour, après plusieurs mois de fabrication, en Allemagne.

Le bloc de verre part alors vers la Californie, où il subit le polissage le plus fin possible.

Une fois poli, il retraverse l’océan atlantique pour se retrouver à Lyon – ici au LMA – pour le traitement de surface qui va enfin en faire un miroir digne de ce nom.

Ce traitement de surface doit être fait dans la plus grande machine de dépôt de ce genre – elle a été développée ici au sein même du laboratoire.

ITV Christophe Michel

Alors cette machine c’est une machine de pulvérisation par faisceau d’ions, qui permet de réaliser des optiques avec très peu de défauts



Tous les détecteurs d’ondes gravitationnelles qui existent dans le monde, que ce soit aux Etats-Unis, au Japon ou celui en Italie, tous les miroirs principaux et critiques ont été réalisés au sein de cette machine.



Donc au début du projet Virgo, les machines permettant de traiter des optiques avaient des capacités de traitement d’optiques jusqu’à 10 cm de diamètre et donc nous avons été obligé de développer cet outil phénoménal qui permettait de traiter jusqu’à 10 fois plus grand en taille, donc jusqu’à un mètre de diamètre.



Et donc c’est à notre connaissance, la plus grande machine de dépôt par pulvérisation ionique dans le monde. Les machines traditionnelles font un mètre cube à l’intérieur, cette machine fait dix mètres cube

Le miroir nécessite jusqu’à deux ans de travail, en tout, avant d’intégrer un détecteur d’ondes gravitationnelles. Et chaque étape doit être réalisée dans des conditions très contrôlée de température, d’hygrométrie, de propreté. Mais comment être sûr que le procédé a bien fonctionné ? qu’il n’y a pas eu d’erreur ?

Pour des composants d’une telle finesse comme ces optiques, chaque manipulation, chaque intervention sur le miroir doit être rigoureusement contrôlée avant de passer à l’étape suivante.

ITV Laurent Pinard

Donc ce système il permet de mesurer la planéité des composants une fois qu’on a réalisé le traitement de couche mince. Notre but c’est de réaliser des dépôts qui ont des défauts de planéité de quelques angstroms, c’est à dire quelques atomes, ce qui est très très faible.

Donc l’échelle fausse un peu les choses, elle accentue les défauts, mais si on regarde l’écart qu’il y a entre le trou au centre qui est bleu et disons la partie haute qui est en rouge sur la périphérie, on peut voir sur l’écran qu’il y a 2 nanomètres – donc 2×10-9 mètres, sachant qu’un nanomètre, c’est 10 atomes, c’est une hauteur de 10 atomes donc on est vraiment pas loin de quelque chose qui est parfait.

Ces performances qui frôlent la perfection ont été récompensés en 2016 après la première détection directe – et tant attendue – des ondes gravitationnelles prédites par Einstein il y a cent ans.

On voit aboutir tous les efforts qu’on a fait pendant, pour certains, pendant 20 ans voire plus, pour d’autres, plus jeunes, depuis dix ans, donc c’est vrai que ça a eu un retentissement mondial donc c’est une fierté personnelle je pense pour tout le monde d’être de l’aventure, et puis c’est motivant pour continuer et essayer de progresser parce qu’on se dit que ‘maintenant ces ondes elles existent bien, on a encore un bel avenir devant nous et il y a encore de belles choses à faire au sein du laboratoire donc c’est très réjouissant pour l’ensemble du laboratoire et très motivant je pense…

Une fois le travail terminé ici, le précieux miroir est délicatement empaqueté. Il peut alors être envoyé vers ces grands détecteurs qui observent l’Univers … et participer à de nouvelles aventures gravitationnelles…

News

Comment se préparer pour la prochaine tempête solaire?

Le Soleil est actuellement dans une période calme de son activité ; le prochain maximum d’activité est prévu dans à peu près cinq ans, mais une forte tempête solaire peut arriver à tout moment, et pas forcément au pic du cycle d’activité solaire. Des scientifiques et des représentants des secteurs industriels pouvant être affectés par les effets de la « météorologie de l’espace » se sont rencontrés au centre de météorologie britannique (UK Met Office) afin de discuter de la façon dont le système FLARECAST de prévision des éruptions solaires doit être construit pour servir au mieux les besoins des utilisateurs.

Mi-Janvier, des représentants des opérateurs de satellites, de compagnies d’aviation civile, des agences de défense et d’organisations gouvernementales ont rencontré au UK Met Office à Exeter des scientifiques du projet européen FLARECAST en provenance de Grèce, d’Irlande, de France, d’Italie, de Suisse et de Grande-Bretagne (le service de météorologie britannique, UK Met Office, est l’un des partenaires du projet FLARECAST). Ensemble, ils ont travaillé sur le futur système de prévision des éruptions solaires FLARECAST et ont ainsi fait un lien entre les avancées scientifiques et technologiques récentes sur la prévision des éruptions et les besoins des utilisateurs. Le but est ainsi d’être mieux préparé à la prochaine grande tempête solaire ! « Établir un dialogue entre scientifiques et utilisateurs est nécessaire dans ce domaine » dit Nicole Vilmer de l’Observatoire de Paris et du CNRS, « C’est un travail long, qui nécessite de nombreux efforts de la part des deux communautés mais qui commence à donner des résultats ». « La question n’est pas de savoir si une éruption importante va se produire, mais de savoir quand elle va se produire » dit Manolis Georgoulis, le chef du projet européen FLARECAST. « Et personne ne peut prévoir exactement son importance ! »

Nous devenons de plus en plus dépendants de technologies utilisant le spatial. En conséquence, nous sommes de plus en plus vulnérables aux effets des tempêtes solaires et aux conditions de météorologie de l’espace. C’est le cas par exemple de l’utilisation des GPS, des radars et des communications radio. « Nous sommes peut-être plus affectés par les effets des éruptions solaires que nous ne le pensons, parce que très souvent les effets de ces tempêtes sur les systèmes technologiques ne sont pas rendus publics. », dit Sophie Murray du Trinity College à Dublin. Il y a donc un besoin non seulement de réaliser des prévisions de météorologie de l’espace, mais aussi d’observer de façon continue les effets sur l’environnement spatial de la Terre.

Plusieurs gouvernements ont déjà inscrit les risques liés aux conditions de météorologie de l’espace dans le catalogue des risques naturels. Cependant des plans cohérents de prévention et d’atténuation des risques manquent encore. L’un des prérequis cruciaux pour l’établissement de ces stratégies est la réalisation d’un système fiable de prévision des éruptions, afin que des mesures de protection des ressources dans l’espace et sur terre puissent être prises à temps.

L’objectif de FLARECAST est justement de développer un tel système de prévision. L’IAS participe au projet en fournissant l’infrastructure de calcul et les données d’observations spatiales sur lesquelles le système est basé, dans le cadre du centre de données et d’opérations MEDOC (CNES/INSU/Univ. Paris-Sud).

spaceweather.jpg

Représentation des effets de la météorologie de l’espace sur les activités humaines.

workshop.jpg

Les participants à l’atelier organisé par FLARECAST avec les utilisateurs de services de météorologie de l’espace.

FLARECAST est un projet de recherche et d’innovation Horizon 2020 de l’Union Européenne (numéro 640216). Sa période de financement va de Janvier-2015 à Décembre 2017. Ses responsables au niveau européen sont Manolis K. Georgoulis, manolis.georgoulis@academyofathens.gr, et D.Shaun Bloomfield, shaun.bloomfield@northumbria.c.uk.

Deux laboratoires en France sont partenaires de FLARECAST:

News

Le projet ByoPiC a officiellement démarré le 1er janvier…

Piloté par Nabila Aghanim, le projet ByoPiC (financé par l’ERC sur le programme Advanced Grants) a pour objectif principal de répondre à une des questions majeures de la cosmologie physique : où se cache la moitié de la matière ordinaire – les baryons – de la toile cosmique dans l’univers récent ?

Grâce à des méthodes statistiques sophistiquées appliquées aux données Planck et aux grands relevés de galaxies, ByoPiC cartographiera le gaz baryonique chaud jusque dans les plus grandes structures de l’univers, les superamas de galaxies et les filaments cosmiques. ByoPiC fournira non seulement un décompte précis des baryons cachés mais fera aussi une caractérisation de leurs propriétés physiques.

logo-erc.jpg

News

Ondes gravitationnelles : les coulisses d’une découverte

Campus d’Orsay. 9 h 00. C’est un lundi comme les autres pour Patrice Hello, physicien du Laboratoire de l’accélérateur linéaire1 (LAL). Il a consacré toute sa carrière à la quête des ondes gravitationnelles, ces tremblements de l’Univers provoqués par des événements cosmiques ultraviolents. Depuis leur description par Albert Einstein en 1915, on n’a que des preuves indirectes de leur existence. Patrice Hello et ses collègues chercheurs ou ingénieurs du LAL tentent de la confirmer depuis des années, en développant les instruments les plus sensibles du monde. Ils ont ainsi largement contribué à la construction de Virgo, le détecteur européen d’ondes gravitationnelles installé près de Pise, en Italie. Ils étudient et développent notamment des kilomètres de tubes à ultravide2, dans lesquels circulent des lasers, des composants fondamentaux des détecteurs d’ondes gravitationnelles actuels. Ils appartiennent également à la collaboration LIGO-Virgo, vaste entente scientifique américano-européenne à l’écoute de cette musique cosmique qui échappe à l’humanité depuis des décennies. Nous sommes le 14 septembre 2015 au matin et le signal tant attendu s’apprête à atteindre notre planète. Il va secouer le monde scientifique sur son passage.

11 h 50 de l’autre côté de l’océan Atlantique. Un instrument scientifique géant installé en Louisiane aux États-Unis mesure, pour la première fois dans l’histoire, une vibration de l’espace. Pendant une fraction de seconde, l’instrument se déforme. Il se rallonge et s’amincit. Puis il se raccourcit et s’élargit. La déformation se répète une dizaine de fois. La même chose se produit sept millisecondes plus tard à 3 000 kilomètres de là, dans le détecteur de Hanford, dans l’État de Washington. En Italie, Virgo, le troisième instrument du réseau, est quant à lui en cours de maintenance. Le système d’alerte de LIGO, détecteur américain d’ondes gravitationnelles, se met en branle. Il sélectionne et enregistre l’événement dans la base de données GraceDB.

Trois minutes plus tard, un courrier électronique est envoyé par le programme à un groupe restreint de chercheurs, les sentinelles qui surveillent les analyses en temps réel. À Hanovre, en Allemagne, Marco Drago est le premier à lire le message. Il est chercheur postdoctorant à l’Institut Max-Planck pour la physique gravitationnelle. «Action required for GraceDB event : G184098 (burst_cwb_allsky).» Le message annonce un événement d’intérêt. Une action est requise.

Au début, Marco Drago pense qu’il s’agit d’une fausse alerte. Des signaux artificiels mimant des événements astrophysiques peuvent en effet être « injectés » dans les instruments. Ce type de leurre instrumental permet de tester les procédures, la réactivité des chercheurs mais aussi leur patience.

Le signal avait

l’air trop beau pour être vrai. Il était tellement fort

qu’il se voyait à

l’œil nu !

En 2010, lors de l’événement baptisé « Big Dog », un signal intéressant avait été produit par les trois détecteurs d’ondes gravitationnelles de la collaboration LIGO-Virgo. Après de laborieuses vérifications des données et une tout aussi laborieuse rédaction d’article scientifique, la nouvelle était tombée : « Big Dog » n’était qu’une injection test. Marco Drago avait donc des doutes, surtout que le détecteur commençait juste sa prise de données ce jour-là. Après quelques appels téléphoniques de vérification, le chercheur envoie un courrier électronique à tous les collaborateurs de LIGO-Virgo.

Ondes gravitationnelles

Pour détecter les ondes gravitationnelles, les scientifiques utilisent des instruments gigantesques tels que l’interféromètre Virgo. Ici, un scientifique inspecte l’un des miroirs de Virgo, construits avec l’un des verres les plus purs du monde.
CNRS Le Journal
Ondes gravitationnelles
Pour détecter les ondes gravitationnelles, les scientifiques utilisent des instruments gigantesques tels que l’interféromètre Virgo. Ici, un scientifique inspecte l’un des miroirs de Virgo, construits avec l’un des verres les plus purs du monde.
Cyril FRESILLON/LMA/CNRS PHOTOTHEQUE
Cyril FRESILLON/LMA/CNRS PHOTOTHEQUE
Partager

Partager

12 h 54.« Very interesting event on ER8. » Événement intéressant sur ER8, soit la période de test qui précède la prise de données officielle. Patrice Hello et ses collègues du LAL reviennent de la cantine lorsqu’ils lisent le courrier électronique de la collaboration. «On s’est dit : “Ça y est, ils ont réussi à injecter les signaux dans le système de contrôle, ils ont enfin réussi à faire leurs injections”», se souvient le physicien. Son collègue Nicolas Arnaud se rappelle également ce moment précis : «Le signal avait l’air trop beau pour être vrai. Il était tellement fort qu’il se voyait à l’œil nu!» Une heure plus tard, tous les chercheurs de la collaboration reçoivent un nouveau message de Marco Drago : il ne s’agit pas d’un faux signal. Les instruments LIGO sont encore incapables de réaliser des injections aveugles de signaux. Tout a fonctionné correctement et le signal correspondrait à la collision de deux trous noirs. L’événement sera baptisé GW150914, suivant la nomenclature de l’astronomie. Si l’information se confirme, il s’agit d’un double séisme scientifique. C’est la première détection directe d’ondes gravitationnelles et la première détection directe de trous noirs. Ces objets astrophysiques extrêmement compacts possèdent une force gravitationnelle telle que toute chose qui s’en approche de trop près ne peut plus s’extirper de leur attraction, pas même la lumière. Les astronomes sont ainsi incapables de les voir avec des télescopes conventionnels sensibles à la lumière et autres ondes électromagnétiques.

La découverte du siècle ?

Désormais, deux tâches se profilent : vérifier que le signal est effectivement d’origine cosmique et s’assurer que la nouvelle ne s’ébruite pas avant la publication des résultats. Il s’agit certainement de la découverte de l’année, peut-être même du siècle. «Un de nos collègues appartient au comité de détection, ajoute Nicolas Arnaud. Ce groupe de scientifiques de LIGO et Virgo valide les étapes à suivre après la détection d’un signal.» Il faut passer quatre phases de vérification avant d’aboutir à l’article qui sera soumis à une revue scientifique. Patrice Hello évoque une étape «épique» qui mènera à l’écriture d’un des articles scientifiques les plus attendus de la discipline. «Il fallait vérifier jusqu’au bout que ce n’était pas des artefacts de l’appareil. Ces instruments sont tellement complexes que l’on ne comprend pas complètement le bruit qui accompagne le signal en sortie du détecteur. On a également imaginé des scénarios selon lesquels on avait été victimes d’actes malveillants. Puisque nous sommes capables d’injecter des signaux comme on veut dans le système de contrôle, des hackers auraient-ils pu faire la même chose ? On a fini par se convaincre qu’un tel acte était impossible sans laisser de traces.»

Reste désormais à organiser l’annonce de la nouvelle au monde entier. Nicolas Arnaud intègre un groupe de chercheurs qui animera la visite de presse du site de Virgo le 11 février, le jour de la publication. Mais d’ici là, il va falloir rester discret.

Un événement cataclysmique

Le signal du 14 septembre aurait été produit par la collision, ou « coalescence », de deux trous noirs d’une trentaine de masses solaires chacun.

Les ondes gravitationnelles doivent nous permettre d’observer l’Univers d’une manière totalement nouvelle.

«Il faut imaginer ces deux mastodontes qui tournent l’un autour de l’autre 75fois par seconde alors qu’ils sont séparés par quelques centaines de kilomètres seulement. Leur vitesse commence à approcher celle de la lumière, donc l’espace-temps autour est tout chamboulé. Ces perturbations ont voyagé pendant plus d’un milliard d’années jusqu’à traverser la Terre le 14septembre vers midi.»

Frédérique Marion travaille au Lapp, le Laboratoire d’Annecy-le-Vieux de physique des particules3, un des six laboratoires français à participer à Virgo. Elle rejoint l’aventure dès les années 1990 et travaille sur la simulation de l’instrument.

Aujourd’hui, elle codirige le comité de détection de la collaboration LIGO-Virgo. «Les ondes gravitationnelles doivent nous permettre d’observer l’Univers d’une manière totalement nouvelle. Contrairement à ce que l’on est capable de voir avec la lumière, ces ondes émises décrivent la dynamique des masses, ce qui se passe véritablement au cœur des phénomènes astrophysiques.»

Vue d’artiste de trous noirs juste avant leur coalescence ou collision.
CNRS Le Journal
Vue d’artiste de trous noirs juste avant leur coalescence ou collision.
C&M. WERNER/VISUAL UNLIMITED, INC/SPL/COSMOS
C&M. WERNER/VISUAL UNLIMITED, INC/SPL/COSMOS
Partager

Partager

L’Univers gélatineux

L’histoire des ondes gravitationnelles commence en 1915 lorsqu’Albert Einstein publie sa théorie de la relativité générale. Cette année-là, le physicien propose une nouvelle façon de voir le monde qui nous entoure. Sa théorie énonce notamment que la gravitation peut être comprise comme une courbure de l’espace-temps. L’espace et le temps sont intimement imbriqués depuis la théorie de la relativité restreinte publiée en 1905, par Einstein également. Par souci de visualisation, il est commun et plus aisé d’imaginer l’espace-temps comme une membrane élastique tendue. Placez une boule de pétanque sur la membrane et la surface s’enfoncera. L’espace-temps est désormais incurvé et les autres masses qui se déplacent auront tendance à suivre les pentes de la membrane avant de tomber sur la boule de pétanque. Une des conséquences de la relativité générale est que cette membrane (l’espace-temps en réalité) peut vibrer lorsque des masses sont accélérées. Tout comme notre membrane va vibrer si deux boules de pétanque finissent par s’entrechoquer. Dans la réalité, les vibrations se propagent dans toutes les directions à la vitesse de la lumière. Et le milieu de propagation n’est pas fait de matière, c’est l’espace lui-même qui vibre. L’Univers s’apparente ainsi à une sorte de gelée. Et notre gelée cosmique vibre au rythme des phénomènes astrophysiques. Chaque masse accélérée produit des tremblements d’Univers, et pas seulement les phénomènes les plus extrêmes. Un exemple : le système Terre-Soleil perd environ 200 watts par émission d’ondes gravitationnelles, soit la puissance nécessaire pour faire fonctionner la trancheuse à jambon de votre traiteur. Le cataclysme détecté en septembre 2015 a quant à lui libéré une puissance cinquante fois plus importante que toutes les étoiles de l’Univers observable !

Lorsque Einstein finit par admettre la réalité de ces ondes gravitationnelles, il concède toutefois que les vibrations seraient si faibles qu’elles échapperaient à toute tentative de détection. Effectivement, le signal est subtil. La vibration qui a traversé la Terre en septembre 2015 n’a ainsi fait varier les distances que de l’ordre de la taille d’un atome sur la distance Terre-Soleil (150 millions de kilomètres) ! Malgré sa grande capacité de projection, Einstein ne pouvait prévoir les trésors d’ingéniosité mis en oeuvre par les scientifiques qui ont suivi ses pas. Afin de comprendre l’incroyable sensibilité d’un détecteur d’ondes gravitationnelles, direction le nord de l’Italie.

Un détecteur franco-italien

La ville de Pise possède une force d’attraction particulière sur les physiciens. Vers 1570, Galilée, père de la science moderne selon certains, y étudie le mouvement de pendules. Il aurait puisé son inspiration dans l’oscillation régulière des lustres de la cathédrale située sur la Piazza del Duomo. Cette magnifique place est connue dans le monde entier pour sa tour penchée et ses touristes qui tentent, le temps d’une photo, de la redresser. Prenez la route vers le sud-est et, 17 kilomètres plus tard, vous arrivez à la ville de Cascina où se dresse une autre cathédrale. Celle-ci n’est pas construite en pierre, mais en béton pris dans un enchevêtrement vertigineux d’acier inoxydable. Pas de vitraux colorés mais des lasers et des miroirs ultraréfléchissants. Nous sommes le mardi 12 janvier 2016. À l’entrée de Virgo, un vent soutenu met les drapeaux italien et français à rude épreuve. Aujourd’hui, la langue de Molière résonne plus que d’habitude dans les couloirs du site. Une équipe de Français issus de plusieurs laboratoires partenaires prépare l’annonce qui doit être faite dans trente jours. La tension est palpable. L’armure de confidentialité entourant la découverte de septembre commence à se fissurer. Le feu des rumeurs couve depuis des semaines et hier, en fin d’après-midi, le tweet du physicien américain Lawrence M. Krauss est venu souffler sur les braises : «Ma rumeur précédente à propos de LIGO a été confirmée par des sources indépendantes. Restez à l’écoute ! Les ondes gravitationnelles ont peut-être été détectées!» Les médias se glissent dans la brèche, impatients de titrer une fois de plus «Einstein avait raison!» Benoît Mours, responsable scientifique de Virgo pour la France, tente de désamorcer la rumeur avec les médias francophones. Il est au téléphone avec un rédacteur du quotidien Le Parisien. «Pensez-vous qu’une fuite est possible?», interroge le journaliste loin d’être rassasié par les réponses du chercheur. « Je suis mal placé pour me prononcer sur une fuite, je ne suis pas plombier », réplique le physicien qui enchaîne sur la réponse type prévue pour cette situation : «Nous collectons beaucoup de données. Nous les analysons et cela prend du temps. Les signaux que nous recherchons sont très faibles. Il faut attendre d’avoir tout collecté pour bien comprendre les choses. Nous essayons d’éviter de faire des erreurs. Ce n’est qu’à la fin de ce long processus que l’on peut être sûr de ce que l’on voit et publier nos résultats…»

J’ai passé les fêtes de Noël avec toute ma famille sans rien leur dire.

Grand, fin, paré de lunettes et d’un sourire qu’il faut déchiffrer, Benoît Mours parle d’une voix douce qui oblige souvent à tendre l’oreille. Le physicien de 58 ans aime comparer le travail de chercheur à celui d’un enquêteur de série policière. «Sauf qu’au lieu de travailler avec des cadavres, on travaille avec la matière, la vie et les grandes énigmes de l’Univers.» Le secret de l’événement, il a su le garder pour lui. «J’ai passé les fêtes de Noël avec toute ma famille sans rien leur dire. Partager ce secret n’est pas forcément un cadeau. Une fois qu’on le détient, c’est dur de le garder pour soi.»

Intérieur du bras ouest de 3 kilomètres dans lequel circule l’un des deux faisceaux laser de Virgo. Un deuxième bras perpendiculaire à celui-ci permet la propagation d’un second faisceau. Chaque galerie contient un tube à ultravide de 120 centimètres de diamètre.
CNRS Le Journal
Intérieur du bras ouest de 3 kilomètres dans lequel circule l’un des deux faisceaux laser de Virgo. Un deuxième bras perpendiculaire à celui-ci permet la propagation d’un second faisceau. Chaque galerie contient un tube à ultravide de 120 centimètres de diamètre.
Cyril FRESILLON/Virgo/CNRS PHOTOTHEQUE
Cyril FRESILLON/Virgo/CNRS PHOTOTHEQUE
Partager

Partager

Benoît Mours travaille sur la quête d’ondes gravitationnelles depuis qu’il a quitté le monde de la physique des particules à la fin des années 1980. «Le problème, c’est qu’il n’y avait plus de problème, tout se passe comme prévu par le modèle standard. Et puis l’astronomie, ça fait rêver.» Lors d’une année sabbatique, il part aux États-Unis, où il noue des premiers liens avec les équipes de LIGO. Il leur présentera notamment le format .gwf (gravitationnal wave frame) qu’il vient de développer pour standardiser les données produites par les détecteurs. Les Américains sont convaincus : Virgo et LIGO parleront la même langue. En 2007, alors que Benoît Mours est porte-parole du détecteur européen, LIGO et Virgo s’associent de manière plus intime. Les deux équipes partagent leurs données, les traitent ensemble et cosignent toutes les publications scientifiques. Les miroirs qui équipent les détecteurs américains sont les mêmes que ceux de Virgo. Tous ont été traités au Laboratoire des matériaux avancés de Lyon. «Nous nous réunissons deux fois par an, dont une fois à Pasadena, en Californie. Mais sinon il y a des réunions téléphoniques toutes les semaines.» La fréquence des échanges entre les deux équipes a considérablement augmenté depuis septembre, surtout depuis les rumeurs.

Les détecteurs de l’extrême

Sur le site de Virgo, Benoît Mours est accompagné, entre autres, de ses collègues Frédérique Marion et Nicolas Arnaud. Ils préparent la conférence de presse qui aura lieu dans moins d’un mois, ce qui va être dit au public («Il ne faut pas expliquer les choses avec des puissances de dix, c’est trop compliqué») et ce qui va être fait («Faut-il faire visiter la salle du laser?»). L’équipe quitte le bâtiment des bureaux pour se diriger vers l’instrument à proprement parler. Les détecteurs d’ondes gravitationnelles cumulent les superlatifs. «Virgo est l’un des plus gros tubes à vide qui existe sur Terre. Il a même un volume d’ultravide supérieur à celui du LHC», souligne Gabriel Chardin, le président du comité des Très Grandes Infrastructures de recherche (TGIR). Cet organe du CNRS participe à la gestion des instruments scientifiques géants comme Virgo, ceux du Cern et les grands télescopes tournés vers le cosmos. Vu de l’espace, Virgo dessine un grand L. En gravissant la colline sur laquelle trône un bâtiment central blanc et sans fenêtre, on aperçoit les deux tubes qui s’étirent sur 3 kilomètres chacun. Avec de telles distances et un instrument aussi sensible, la courbure de la Terre devient un paramètre à prendre en compte. Dans chaque tube de 3 kilomètres règne l’ultravide. La construction de Virgo fut une prise de risque sans précédent pour le CNRS et son partenaire italien, l’Institut national de physique nucléaire (INPN).

«Habituellement, il y a un continuum entre les différentes étapes qui mènent à la création d’un très gros instrument», détaille Gabriel Chardin. «Il y a l’émergence, le démarrage des idées, suivi de projets intermédiaires, qui débouchent finalement sur une très grande infrastructure de recherche.

C’est un dépassement technologique extraordinaire.

La précision obtenue par ces interféromètres

est gigantesque.

Pour Virgo, tout était nouveau, il fallait commencer directement par la construction d’un très gros instrument. La part de risque était forte, mais les études montraient que l’on devait pouvoir y arriver.» Patrice Hello, du LAL, se rappelle également les balbutiements des débuts. «Les arguments étaient à la fois scientifiques et techniques. Il fallait construire un grand interféromètre suspendu, avec des lasers à la fois de puissance et stabilisés en amplitude et en fréquence. Ces deux choses sont habituellement antagonistes. Mais on s’est rendu compte que toutes les technologies nécessaires étaient mûres : lasers, optique et technique du vide. Quand on regardait chaque petit défi, cela paraissait possible. La grande difficulté de Virgo était d’assembler et de faire fonctionner ensemble toutes ces technologies de pointe.»

Réglage d’un miroir du télescope d’entrée d’un banc optique de Virgo. Grâce à ce dispositif, le faisceau laser de 20 centimètres de diamètre est réduit à quelques millimètres avant d’être capté par des photodiodes et caméras utilisées par les contrôles de l’interféromètre.
CNRS Le Journal
Réglage d’un miroir du télescope d’entrée d’un banc optique de Virgo. Grâce à ce dispositif, le faisceau laser de 20 centimètres de diamètre est réduit à quelques millimètres avant d’être capté par des photodiodes et caméras utilisées par les contrôles de l’interféromètre.
Cyril FRESILLON/LAPP/CNRS PHOTOTHEQUE
Cyril FRESILLON/LAPP/CNRS PHOTOTHEQUE
Partager

Partager

Le principe de Virgo, un grand interféromètre de Michelson, est relativement simple. Un faisceau laser est scindé en deux par un miroir semi-réfléchissant, appelé « séparatrice ». Les deux faisceaux produits parcourent alors une certaine distance, sont réfléchis par des miroirs puis recombinés au niveau de la séparatrice. La recombinaison produit des interférences que l’on peut enregistrer avec un capteur. Cette technique a été inventée à la fin du XIXe siècle par Albert Abraham Michelson et Edward Morley lorsqu’ils ont tenté de démontrer l’existence de l’éther, support supposé de propagation de la lumière. Leur expérience a finalement montré que l’éther n’existait pas et que la lumière conservait une vitesse constante quels que soient les déplacements de l’observateur. Les bras de leur interféromètre mesuraient 10 mètres chacun. Les bras de Virgo mesurent 300 fois plus. «D’un point de vue technologique, c’est sans commune mesure», s’enthousiasme Gabriel Chardin, pourtant habitué des instruments scientifiques les plus puissants et volumineux du monde. «C’est un dépassement technologique extraordinaire. La précision obtenue par ces interféromètres est gigantesque par rapport à ce qui se faisait avant en termes de recherche d’ondes gravitationnelles.» La sensibilité extrême de Virgo et LIGO repose sur la taille de l’interféromètre mais aussi sur la stabilité de ses éléments. Les miroirs ultrapolis qui guident les faisceaux laser doivent être suspendus à des systèmes qui annulent toute vibration qui viendrait du sol. Une colonne de sept stabilisateurs empilés assure que les miroirs et bancs optiques restent les objets les plus immobiles sur Terre. Sans ces précautions, une vague qui percute la côte à des dizaines de kilomètres perturberait la mesure. Le passage d’une onde gravitationnelle, en modifiant la longueur du chemin à parcourir par le laser entre les miroirs, laisse un signal dans l’interférence des deux faisceaux laser recombinés.

Des signaux à traiter en temps réel

La fréquence et l’amplitude de l’onde gravitationnelle peuvent ensuite être déterminées à partir de ce signal. Puis, de ces deux paramètres, les chercheurs déduisent la nature de l’événement astrophysique à la source de l’émission. «Les analyses sont faites en temps réel afin de pouvoir envoyer des alertes à des télescopes conventionnels pour détecter un signal électromagnétique, avec de la lumière donc, lié au même événement», souligne Frédérique Marion. L’analyse en temps réel se fait en « glissant » des espèces de calques numériques sur les données produites en continu par les instruments. «Pour la recherche de signaux provoqués par la collision de trous noirs ou étoiles à neutrons, on peut s’appuyer sur nos prédictions. Si on connaît les masses des astres, on peut prédire le signal qui va être produit. La difficulté, c’est que le signal que l’on cherche dépend de la masse des objets que l’on ne connaît pas a priori. Cela veut donc dire qu’il faut balayer tout l’espace des paramètres pour rechercher plein de signaux différents correspondant à plein de paramètres différents.»

La création des centaines de milliers de calques qui balayent les données de Virgo et LIGO représente un travail colossal, appuie Patrice Hello : «On peut considérer que c’est une grande découverte en soi. Résoudre numériquement les équations de la relativité générale est très compliqué. Il nous a fallu des supercalculateurs et des méthodes numériques très sophistiquées.» Cette difficulté provient du caractère non linéaire de la relativité générale, explique Frédérique Marion : «La masse influe sur l’espace qui est autour d’elle mais en même temps, c’est l’espace, sa courbure, qui va dire à la masse comment elle doit se déplacer. Donc il y a un effet qui se mord la queue. Et ces effets non linéaires sont d’autant plus forts dans des conditions extrêmes, comme dans le cas des trous noirs.»

Le signal gravitationnel est détectable au niveau de cette table optique du bâtiment central de Virgo, qui mesure l’interférence des deux faisceaux laser recombinés après leur passage dans les bras de 3 kilomètres.
CNRS Le Journal
Le signal gravitationnel est détectable au niveau de cette table optique du bâtiment central de Virgo, qui mesure l’interférence des deux faisceaux laser recombinés après leur passage dans les bras de 3 kilomètres.
Cyril FRESILLON/Virgo/CNRS PHOTOTHEQUE
Cyril FRESILLON/Virgo/CNRS PHOTOTHEQUE
Partager

Partager

Une nouvelle fenêtre sur l’Univers

La visite de Virgo touche à sa fin pour les équipes françaises. Après un passage à l’extrémité du bras ouest, Nicolas Arnaud revient vers le bâtiment central de la séparatrice au volant d’une voiturette électrique « qui sert surtout lors de la visite des journalistes ». À sa gauche défile le tube à vide de 3 kilomètres dans lequel circule le laser. «Virgo est un instrument gigantesque, donc on éprouve à la fois un sentiment de grandeur et une humilité liée au fait que l’on est très nombreux à y contribuer. Que l’on travaille dans l’électronique, dans le contrôle du vide, dans l’informatique, dans l’analyse des données, dans l’instrumentation, chacun apporte sa propre pierre. Et voir que toutes ces volontés, ces activités convergent vers un seul et même but, je trouve cela très beau.»

L’annonce

11 février 2016. La découverte va être annoncée simultanément à Washington DC, au siège du CNRS à Paris et sur le site de Virgo en Italie. Nicolas Arnaud débute la visite du site italien avec des journalistes triés sur le volet. Benoît Mours et Frédérique Marion sont assis à la table des intervenants au CNRS face à un parterre de caméras, de calepins et de micros. «Je vis un mélange de tension, d’émotion et de soulagement de pouvoir enfin partager ce secret avec le monde», confie Frédérique Marion. Tous les sites sont reliés par visioconférence et des serveurs dédiés retransmettent l’événement en direct. Un record de connexions fait d’ailleurs tomber quatre serveurs du centre de calcul.

Après quelques balbutiements techniques, la conférence peut commencer. La parole est donnée en premier aux Américains. Ce sont leurs instruments qui ont fait la détection. Le directeur du LIGO, David Reitze, prend la parole sous les applaudissements : « We did it ! » Fulvio Ricci, porte-parole de Virgo, enchaîne depuis Cascina, en Italie. «C’est un cap crucial pour la physique, mais, plus important encore, il s’agit du début d’une longue série de nouvelles découvertes excitantes à faire avec LIGO et Virgo.»

Après les ondes électromagnétiques (lumière, ondes radio, rayons X…), qui ont permis aux astronomes d’observer des phénomènes et des objets cosmiques de plus en plus éloignés, les ondes gravitationnelles vont désormais permettre d’étudier des événements extrêmes et de remonter plus loin dans l’histoire de l’Univers. Le détecteur Virgo redémarrera bientôt avec une sensibilité plus poussée. Grâce aux trois instruments de la collaboration LIGO-Virgo, la communauté scientifique disposera alors d’un observatoire gravitationnel capable d’identifier et de localiser encore plus précisément les sources de ces précieuses ondes. L’ère de l’astronomie gravitationnelle est née.

À voir : Ondes gravitationnelles : les détecteurs de l’extrême

Cet article a été publié le 3 novembre 2016 dans le premier numéro de Carnets de Science, première revue d’information scientifique du CNRS destinée au grand public. En vente dans les librairies et Relay, ainsi que sur le site Carnets de science.

CNRS Le Journal
CNRS Editions
CNRS Editions
Partager

Partager

Notes

  • 1. Unité CNRS/Université Paris-Sud.
  • 2. Il y règne une pression mille milliards de fois plus faible que l’atmosphère.
  • 3. Unité CNRS/Université Savoie Mont-Blanc.
News

Science Release: Spinning black hole swallowing star explains superluminous…

heic1622 — Science Release

Hubble helps reinterpret brilliant explosion

12 December 2016

An extraordinarily brilliant point of light seen in a distant galaxy, and dubbed ASASSN-15lh, was thought to be the brightest supernova ever seen. But new observations from several observatories, including the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, have now cast doubt on this classification. Instead, a group of astronomers propose that the source was an even more extreme and rare event — a rapidly spinning black hole ripping apart a passing star that came too close.

In 2015, the All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN) detected an event, named ASASSN-15lh, that was recorded as the brightest supernova ever — and categorised as a superluminous supernova, the explosion of an extremely massive star at the end of its life. It was twice as bright as the previous record holder, and at its peak was 20 times brighter than the total light output of the entire Milky Way.

An international team, led by Giorgos Leloudas at the Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel, and the Dark Cosmology Centre, Denmark, has now made additional observations of the distant galaxy, about 4 billion light-years from Earth, where the explosion took place and they have proposed a new explanation for this extraordinary event.

“We observed the source for 10 months following the event and have concluded that the explanation is unlikely to lie with an extraordinary bright supernova. Our results indicate that the event was probably caused by a rapidly spinning supermassive black hole as it destroyed a low-mass star,” explains Leloudas.

In this scenario, the extreme gravitational forces of a supermassive black hole, located in the centre of the host galaxy, ripped apart a Sun-like star that wandered too close — a so-called tidal disruption event, something so far only observed about 10 times. In the process, the star was “spaghettified” and shocks in the colliding debris as well as heat generated in accretion led to a burst of light. This gave the event the appearance of a very bright supernova explosion, even though the star would not have become a supernova on its own as it did not have enough mass.

The team based their new conclusions on observations from a selection of telescopes, both on the ground and in space. Among them was the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, the Very Large Telescope at ESO’s Paranal Observatory and the New Technology Telescope at ESO’s La Silla Observatory [1].

“There are several independent aspects to the observations that suggest that this event was indeed a tidal disruption and not a superluminous supernova,” explains coauthor Morgan Fraser from the University of Cambridge, UK (now at University College Dublin, Ireland).

In particular, the data revealed that the event went through three distinct phases over the 10 months of follow-up observations. These data overall more closely resemble what is expected for a tidal disruption than a superluminous supernova. An observed re-brightening in ultraviolet light as well as a temperature increase further reduce the likelihood of a supernova event. Furthermore, the location of the event — a red, massive and passive galaxy — is not the usual home for a superluminous supernova explosion, which normally occur in blue, star-formingdwarf galaxies.

Although the team say a supernova source is therefore very unlikely, they accept that a classical tidal disruption event would not be an adequate explanation for the event either. Team member Nicholas Stone from Columbia University, USA, elaborates: “The tidal disruption event we propose cannot be explained with a non-spinning supermassive black hole. We argue that ASASSN-15lh was a tidal disruption event arising from a very particular kind of black hole.”

The mass of the host galaxy implies that the supermassive black hole at its centre has a mass of at least 100 million times that of the Sun. A black hole of this mass would normally be unable to disrupt stars outside of its event horizon — the boundary within which nothing is able to escape its gravitational pull. However, if the black hole is a particular kind that happens to be rapidly spinning — a so-called Kerr black hole — the situation changes and this limit no longer applies.

“Even with all the collected data we cannot say with 100% certainty that the ASASSN-15lh event was a tidal disruption event,” concludes Leloudas. “But it is by far the most likely explanation.”

Notes

[1] As well as the data from ESO’s Very Large Telescope, the New Technology Telescope and the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope the team used observations from NASA’s Swift telescope, the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope (LCOGT), the Australia Telescope Compact Array, ESA’s XMM-Newton, the Wide-Field Spectrograph (WiFeS) and the Magellan Telescope.

More information

The Hubble Space Telescope is a project of international cooperation between ESA and NASA.

This research was presented in a paper entitled “The Superluminous Transient ASASSN-15lh as a Tidal Disruption Event from a Kerr Black Hole”, by G. Leloudas et al. to appear in the new Nature Astronomy magazine.

The team is composed of G. Leloudas (Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel; Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen, Denmark), M. Fraser (University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK), N. C. Stone (Columbia University, New York, USA), S. van Velzen (The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, USA), P. G. Jonker (Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Utrecht, the Netherlands; Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, the Netherlands), I. Arcavi (Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, Goleta, USA; University of California, Santa Barbara, USA), C. Fremling (Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden), J. R. Maund (University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK), S. J. Smartt (Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, UK), T. Krühler (Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Garching b. München, Germany), J. C. A. Miller-Jones (ICRAR – Curtin University, Perth, Australia), P. M. Vreeswijk (Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel), A. Gal-Yam (Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel), P. A. Mazzali (Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, UK; Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Garching b. München, Germany), A. De Cia (European Southern Observatory, Garching b. München, Germany), D. A. Howell (Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, Goleta, USA; University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, USA), C. Inserra (Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, UK), F. Patat (European Southern Observatory, Garching b. München, Germany), A. de Ugarte Postigo (Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia, Granada, Spain; Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen, Denmark), O. Yaron (Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel), C. Ashall (Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, UK), I. Bar (Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel), H. Campbell (University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK; University of Surrey, Guildford, UK), T.-W. Chen (Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Garching b. München, Germany), M. Childress (University of Southampton, Southampton, UK), N. Elias-Rosa (Osservatoria Astronomico di Padova, Padova, Italy), J. Harmanen (University of Turku, Piikkiö, Finland), G. Hosseinzadeh (Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, Goleta, USA; University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, USA), J. Johansson (Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel), T. Kangas (University of Turku, Piikkiö, Finland), E. Kankare (Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, UK), S. Kim (Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile), H. Kuncarayakti (Millennium Institute of Astrophysics, Santiago, Chile; Universidad de Chile, Santiago, Chile), J. Lyman (University of Warwick, Coventry, UK), M. R. Magee (Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, UK), K. Maguire (Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, UK), D. Malesani (University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; DTU Space, Denmark), S. Mattila (University of Turku, Piikkiö, Finland; Finnish Centre for Astronomy with ESO (FINCA), University of Turku, Piikkiö, Finland; University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK), C. V. McCully (Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, Goleta, USA; University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, USA), M. Nicholl (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA), S. Prentice (Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, UK), C. Romero-Cañizales (Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile; Millennium Institute of Astrophysics, Santiago, Chile), S. Schulze (Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile; Millennium Institute of Astrophysics, Santiago, Chile), K. W. Smith (Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, UK), J. Sollerman (Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden), M. Sullivan (University of Southampton, Southampton, UK), B. E. Tucker (Australian National University, Canberra, Australia; ARC Centre of Excellence for All-sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO), Australia), S. Valenti (University of California, Davis, USA), J. C. Wheeler (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, USA), and D. R. Young (Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, UK).

Image credit: ESA/Hubble, ESO

Links

Contacts

Giorgos Leloudas

Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen

Copenhagen, Denmark

Tel: +972 89346511

Email: giorgos@dark-cosmology.dk

Mathias Jäger

ESA/Hubble, Public Information Officer

Garching bei München, Germany

Tel: +49 176 62397500

Email: mjaeger@partner.eso.org

News

Photo Release: Festive nebulae light up Milky Way Galaxy…

heic1623 — Photo Release

20 December 2016

The sheer observing power of the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope is rarely better illustrated than in an image such as this. This glowing pink nebula, named NGC 248, is located in the Small Magellanic Cloud, just under 200 000 light-years away and yet can still be seen in great detail.

Our home galaxy, the Milky Way, is part of a collection of galaxies known as the Local Group. Along with the Andromeda Galaxy, the Milky Way is one of the Group’s most massive members, around which many smaller satellite galaxies orbit. The Magellanic Clouds are famous examples, which can easily be seen with the naked eye from the southern hemisphere.

Within the smaller of these satellite galaxies, the Small Magellanic Cloud, the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope captured two festive-looking emission nebulae, conjoined so they appear as one. Intense radiation from the brilliant central stars is causing hydrogen in the nebulae to glow pink.

Together the nebulae are called NGC 248. They were discovered in 1834 by the astronomer Sir John Herschel. NGC 248 is about 60 light-years long and 20 light-years wide. It is among a number of glowing hydrogen nebulae in the Small Magellanic Cloud, which lies in the southern constellation of Tucana (The Toucan), about 200 000 light-years away.

The nebula was observed as part of a Hubble survey, the Small Magellanic cloud Investigation of Dust and Gas Evolution (SMIDGE). In this survey astronomers are using Hubble to probe the Small Magellanic Cloud to understand how its dust — an important component of many galaxies and related to star formation — is different from the dust in the Milky Way.

Thanks to its relative proximity, the Small Magellanic Cloud is a valuable target. It also turns out to have only between a fifth and a tenth of the amount of heavy elements that the Milky Way has, making the dust similar to what we expect to see in galaxies in the earlier Universe.

This allows astronomers to use it as a cosmic laboratory to study the history of the Universe in our cosmic backyard. These observations also help us to understand the history of our own galaxy as most of the star formation happened earlier in the Universe, at a time when the percentage of heavy elements in the Milky Way was much lower than it is now.

The data used in this image were taken with Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys in September 2015.

More information

The Hubble Space Telescope is a project of international cooperation between ESA and NASA.

Image credit: NASA, ESA, STScI, K. Sandstrom (University of California, San Diego), and the SMIDGE team.

Links

Contacts

Karin Sandstrom

University of California

San Diego, USA

Tel: +1 858-246-0552

Email: kmsandstrom@ucsd.edu

Mathias Jäger

ESA/Hubble, Public Information Officer

Garching bei München, Germany

Tel: +49 176 62397500

Email: mjaeger@partner.eso.org

News

Ces recherches qui ont marqué 2016

Le 11 février dernier, des chercheurs annoncent au monde entier avoir détecté des ondes gravitationnelles, un siècle après leur description par Einstein. L’événement, historique, aura sans aucun doute marqué 2016 de son empreinte. Mais l’année a été riche de bien d’autres résultats majeurs, allant de la datation de la grotte de Bruniquel à l’établissement de la plus grosse preuve de l’histoire des mathématiques. Les temps forts auront été aussi nombreux, avec par exemple la fin de la mission Rosetta ou le départ de l’expédition Tara Pacific. Revivez certains de ces événements grâce à ce petit florilège d’articles et vidéos publiés sur CNRS Le journal.

News

Xavier Barcons Appointed as Next ESO Director General

eso1643 — Organisation Release

9 December 2016

The ESO Council has appointed Xavier Barcons, 57, as the next Director General of ESO. He will take up his position on 1 September 2017, when Tim de Zeeuw, the current Director General, completes his mandate.

On behalf of Council, I am delighted to appoint Xavier Barcons as Tim de Zeeuw’s successor as Director General,” says Patrick Roche, President of ESO Council. “Xavier is ideally placed to lead the further development of the organisation in the next phase of its programme, including the construction of the European Extremely Large Telescope, the most powerful and ambitious telescope of its kind. We thank Tim for his exemplary leadership of ESO through a remarkably successful decade, which has firmly established ESO as the leading astronomical observatory on Earth.

Professor Xavier Barcons is Spanish and has had a distinguished career both in the academic world and also as an expert in science policy. He is also well known at ESO after his active and successful term as Council President between 2012 and 2014, a period that included the approval of the E-ELT Programme and the start of Phase 1 of the telescope’s construction. He has also served as an active member and chair of many other ESO committees, most recently being chair of the Observing Programmes Committee.

Tim de Zeeuw comments: “I am very pleased to hand the baton to Xavier, who I have had the great pleasure of working closely with for many years. The scope of ESO’s programme has expanded a lot and the future looks bright — ALMA is producing fascinating science, the E-ELT is under construction and new projects and Member States are on the horizon. But there are also undoubtedly many challenges to come, and I can’t think of a better captain to steer the ship than Xavier!

Xavier Barcons adds: “I feel very honoured to take on the leadership of ESO at this exciting time. During Tim’s leadership the organisation has flourished and grown. I look forward to seeing the E-ELT come to fruition and overseeing the further development of the Very Large Telescope, ALMA and many other projects at ESO. I also look forward to working with ESO’s world-class staff.

Xavier Barcons began his career as a physicist and completed his PhD at the University of Cantabria in 1985 on the subject of hot plasmas and the intergalactic medium. This led to an interest in X-ray astronomy and the study of the spectra of distant quasars. After a period working in Cambridge, UK, he returned to Spain and was instrumental in establishing the first X-ray astronomy group in his country. Since 2002 has has been Research Professor at the Spanish Council for Scientific Research (CSIC).

Xavier’s subsequent research has focussed on X-ray astronomy and he has used data from many space observatories, including Einstein, ROSAT and XMM-Newton, as well as arranging many coordinated ground-based observing campaigns at ESO and elsewhere. During the last 15 years he has been promoting a next generation European X-ray observatory, now selected by ESA as the Athena mission. A particular area of scientific interest is the nature of active galactic nuclei in the distant Universe and how observing both from space and the ground can lead to a better understanding of their properties and evolution.

Xavier Barcons is married and has two children.

Contacts

Richard Hook

ESO Public Information Officer

Garching bei München, Germany

Tel: +49 89 3200 6655

Cell: +49 151 1537 3591

Email: rhook@eso.org

Connect with ESO on social media

News

Watch Resupply Mission Chase Down the International Space Station…

Watch a cargo mission approach the International Space Station this weekend.

H-IIB rocket

The H-IIB rocket poised to launch HTV-6.
JAXA

Got a pass of the International Space Station (ISS) this weekend? Watch carefully, and you might just see an additional visitor: the Japanese H-II Transfer Vehicle HTV-6 cargo mission, launching today.

HTV-6 Kounotori (“white stork” in Japanese) launches today at 8:26 a.m. EST / 13:26 UT atop an H-2B rocket from Tanegashima Space Center on the southern tip of Kyushu Island in Japan. Headed toward an orbit matching the ISS at 256 miles (410 kilometers) above the Earth’s surface, grapple and capture of the HTV-6 will be broadcast live on NASA TV on Tuesday, December 13th, starting at 4:30 a.m. EST / 9:30 UT. Capture for berthing of HTV-6 to the nadir node of the Harmony module is expected to occur at 6:00 a.m. EST /11:00 UT.

Watch the launch here (launch countdown begins around 59:30 into the video):

What Is HTV-6?

HTV-5, as seen from the International Space Station

HTV-5 as seen from the International Space Station (ISS).
NASA/JAXA

HTV-6 carries 5.9 metric tons of cargo, including food, water and experiments for the ISS. Also on the manifest are new lithium ion batteries set to replace the aging nickel-hydride batteries used for power while the ISS is in Earth’s shadow. HTV-6 will undock for a destructive reentry in early 2017.

This cargo supply flight comes just over a week after the loss of the Russian Progress-65 mission just six minutes after liftoff from the Baikonur Cosmodrome on December 1st.

Prospects for Spotting HTV-6

HTV-6 launches five minutes behind the ISS on its 90-minute orbit around Earth. After achieving its initial orbit, HTV-6 will need to perform a series of engine burns over the next several days to boost its orbit further and reach the ISS.

If the ISS will be passing overhead this weekend (check for ISS passes for your location here), it’s worth watching a few minutes before and after to find the HTV-6 spacecraft along the same course. We spied the last HTV-5 module chasing the ISS through the Florida dawn as a +1-magnitude star-like object back in 2015.

HTV orbit

The “orbital step ladder” HTV takes to reach the ISS.
NASA

The closer it gets to grapple and berthing on Tuesday, the closer the HTV-6 will be to the brilliant ISS. ISS passes starting Friday night favor latitudes 40° to 55° north (including the United Kingdom and the northern tier of the contiguous United States and southern Canada) for dusk passes, and 30° to 45° south latitude (including New Zealand and the southern tip of South America) for dawn passes.

Heavens-Above is a great place to find ISS passes for your locale, as is NASA’s Spot the Station. All predictions stem from U.S. Joint Space Operations Command (JSpOC), which publishes public Two Line Elements (TLEs) for unclassified missions shortly after launch. Registered users can access TLEs on the Space-Track website. We like to manually check these prior to an ISS pass and plug them in to a nifty satellite tracking application named Orbitron.

orbitron

An Orbitron screenshot.
Orbitron

Too much work? Follow us on Twitter (we’re @Astroguyz) and we’ll update sighting prospects for the HTV-6 versus the ISS worldwide post launch.

HTV-6 isn’t the only mission that occasionally stalks the ISS. Russian Progress vehicles, the European Space Agency’s ATV spacecraft, SpaceX’s Dragon and Orbital ATK’s Cygnus all make port of calls at the station. The Russian Soyuz spacecraft also make a few flights a year, and are currently the only way crew can reach and depart the ISS. SpaceX’s Dragon also provides the only automated down-mass return capability from the ISS, splashing down in the Pacific.

The second stages of these missions also sometimes remain along the path of the ISS for a few days post-launch, although in the case of an H-2B rocket shot, the second stage usually reenters over the Pacific shortly after launch.

Some near-future flights to the ISS to watch out for include: SpaceX’s Dragon on CRS-10 (January 22nd), Progress-66P (February 2nd), and Cygnus on OA-7 (March 16th). Dragon launches are particularly dramatic, as they generate four pieces of hardware (Dragon, the Falcon second stage, and the two solar panel covers) often spotted on the first orbital pass.

Don’t miss the ISS and friends, crossing a sky near you!

The post Watch Resupply Mission Chase Down the International Space Station This Weekend appeared first on Sky & Telescope.

News

“Library Telescope” Program Takes Off

From humble beginnings in 2008, a simple idea — equipping libraries with loaner telescopes — has caught on across the United States.

    game-changer (n):  a person or event that alters the status quo in a significant and permanent way
Library telescope with kids

Thanks to an outreach program started in 2008, hundreds of specially modified Orion StarBlast 4.5 telescopes are now available to library patrons across the U.S.
Jennifer Stowbridge

The New Hampshire Astronomical Society is a typical local club, with a few score amateur skywatchers interested in telescopes and observing the night sky. And like pretty much every astronomy club, the NHAS has watched its membership gradually get older and grayer. Attracting a younger crowd has been a tough sell, despite an active outreach program with plenty of star parties and community involvement

Marc Stowbridge

Marc Stowbridge conceived the highly successful library telescope program in 2008.
Ted Blank

Then in late 2008, NHAS member Marc Stowbridge hit upon a novel idea. Why not take the concept of a “loaner telescope,” which the NHAS already provided to its members, and extend it to his local library? That would allow its patrons — especially young ones — to check out a portable, user-friendly scope as if it were a book or DVD. So he took a small telescope, modified it a bit to perform well in unfamiliar hands, and donated it to his local library. It was an immediate hit.

So Stowbridge and other members of NHAS’s Educational Outreach Committee found two libraries willing to lend telescopes in 2008 and donated another 10 the next year. Word soon spread (apparently librarians share good ideas a lot), and at last count more than 100 had been distributed statewide. Some participating libraries have months-long waiting lists of eager patrons; several have more than one on hand to meet the demand.

Orion’s StarBlast 4.5: An Ideal Loaner Scope

Most people imagine a backyard telescope to be a long, skinny refractor sitting atop a spindly tripod. Of course, first-time buyers scoop up millions of these annually. However, Stowbridge and the NHAS team quickly settled on Orion’s StarBlast 4.5 as their starting point. (Here’s the S&T review of it from 2003.) It’s economical, robust, and well built. It boasts quality optics that provide satisfying wide-field views. And it’s very newbie-friendly.

Key changes to Orion StarBlast 4.5

Modifications to the beginner-friendly Orion StarBlast 4.5 tabletop reflector include: (1) adding “Can’t Lose Strings” to loose parts; (2) cutting a 2-inch hole in the end cap to reduce the Moon’s brightness; (3) installing an AA-battery pack for the red-dot finder; (4) adding setscrews in the focusing tube; (5) providing an 8-to-24-mm zoom eyepiece; and (6) adding a Sun warning and other stickers to the main tube.
S&T / J. Kelly Beatty

But a just-out-of-the-box StarBlast still needed critical tweaks to endure the bumps and bruises that a loaner scope would likely endure. So the NHAS assembled a “build team” of volunteers to make some modifications. First, they replaced Orion’s two standard-issue eyepieces with Celestron’s 8-to-24-mm zoom eyepiece, which provides magnifications of 19× to 56×, and they used small, recessed set screws to anchor it firmly into the focusing tube.

Then they replaced the primary mirror’s collimation screws — shiny temptations for inexperienced hands — with hard-to-turn locknuts (some clubs cover simply enclose the tube’s back end with a plastic cover). And the endurance of the scope’s red-dot finder is greatly extended by replacing its button battery with an external battery pack. Attaching “can’t lose strings” prevent dust caps from being lost, and cutting a small hole in the main dust cap allows an overly bright Moon to be viewed comfortably.

To enhance each borrower’s observing experience, club members affix a Moon map and solar-viewing warning to the tube and include a small pack containing a laminated 4-by-6-inch instruction manual, National Audubon’s pocket guide to the constellations, and a strap-on headlamp equipped with red LEDs.

Click here for details of how to make the suggested modifications.

I attended one of the NHAS “construction parties” last year to see these transformations firsthand. With practice, and with enough volunteers to create optical, mechanical, and electrical “tiger teams,” each scope takes less than 2 hours of effort to be ready for placement. An important side benefit is the camaraderie among club members that I witnessed.

An Explosion of Telescopes

The NHAS program might have remained just a quirky success story had it not come to the attention of the Astronomical League. Thanks in part to the League’s promotion of the idea among its affiliated societies, and in part to an October 2014 S&T article by League president John Jardine Goss, scores of clubs across the U.S. have started library-telescope programs of their own. Some are modest, with just a few StarBlasts making their debut, while other efforts have proven wildly popular.

One group that’s really embraced the library-telescope program is the St. Louis Astronomical Society. SLAS members kicked off their effort in October 2014 (here’s the press release), and the requests just kept pouring in. At last count, this club had placed 131 modified StarBasts in libraries in east-central Missouri and west-central Illinois.

Library-telescope modification team

Members of the St. Louis Astronomical Society and 11 neighboring clubs spend all day modifying 48 StarBlast telescopes for placement in the region’s libraries.
Donald Ficken

Even more impressive is the planning and execution that goes into making the modifications. The club’s last work session, back in August, involved 60 volunteers from 12 different organizations. They took over a branch of the St. Louis County library to upgrade 48 StarBlasts during a 7½-hour frenzy of drilling, wiring, adjusting, and packaging. To get a sense of this mass-production telescope modification, check out the club’s photo gallery from last August and two sets of photos (here and here) from the previous “build” in March 2016.

Even with discounts from Orion and Celestron, the cost per telescope package totals about $325. Some clubs (or individual members) choose to donate some telescopes outright, especially when introducing the program, but in most cases the libraries themselves pay — often in concert with contributions from “Friends of the Library” groups or local businesses.

The League is also active in spreading the program into new cities and towns. For the past two years, it has given away 10 telescope-eyepiece “startup kits” at its annual meeting. “This program is due to the vision and generosity of the Horkheimer Charitable Fund, Orion Telescopes, and Celestron,” notes League president John Goss. “Without their support, we couldn’t offer this program.”

Making a Difference

Orion StarBlast 4.5 in a library

This user-friendly tabletop telescope might be ready and waiting at a library near you.
S&T / J. Kelly Beatty

Library telescopes are certainly increasing interest in amateur astronomy. According to Stowbridge, a typical borrower is an adult 30 to 40 years old with school-age children. He estimates that, on average six people use a telescope each time it’s checked out.

But is the effort starting to draw more young people into astronomy? Solid stats are hard to come by, and in many regions the lending program is just getting started. Some librarians are intimidated or fear the scope will get damaged. Others worry about people looking at the Sun (no solar filter is provided). And some clubs have been reluctant to take on the commitment of time and resources.

However, the usual response ranges from positive to wildly enthusiastic. “What I’ve seen is that when one library has success with the scope, other branches soon want one too,” Goss notes. So, for now, perhaps just getting more people to enjoy views of the Moon and planets through a decent telescope is reward enough.

Is your club participating in a library-telescope program, or have you used one of these specially-modified scopes? If so, add a comment below to let me know about your experiences.

The post “Library Telescope” Program Takes Off appeared first on Sky & Telescope.

News

The Passing of John Glenn

John Glenn, 1921–2016

John Glenn, 1921–2016

Do you remember? I do.

I was a starry-eyed 10-year-old watching on black-and-white TV as John Glenn became the first American to orbit Earth, in February 1962. Yes, the Soviet Union’s Yuri Gagarin had done it first. Yes, Alan Shepherd and Gus Grissom had already made brief pop-up-and-fall-back flights from Cape Canaveral to become the first Americans in space. But for me, Glenn’s three orbits made the Space Age seem like a real, permanent thing. The stars would be our destination. In my lifetime.

Well. . . .

In 1998, at age 77, Glenn again returned to low-Earth orbit, basically repeating his first flight. Yes, the space shuttle Discovery was a bigger and better vehicle, and he was no longer alone, and he stayed up much longer and lent himself to experiments in zero-g geriatric science. But the stars our destination? In the 1960s our society had seemed to be rocketing upward in so many great and confident ways.

This afternoon Glenn passed away at age 95. You can read full obituaries all over the news. But I can’t help but feel that something else has passed.

And no human has been beyond low Earth orbit since 1972.

—Alan MacRobert

The post The Passing of John Glenn appeared first on Sky & Telescope.